Career coaching, life and personal coaching, career mentor blog

To stay or go? Six signs it’s time to leave your job and why you need to listen

There’s not a single person that I’ve met that hasn’t had a job that’ made them miserable.

While most of us just ‘put up with it’, being in an emotionally charged environment can take a toll on your mental wellbeing, affect your relationships outside work, and put you at risk of injury, fatigue and burnout.

Sustained periods of chronic stress can cause more psychological damage than you realise, can also lead to (or exacerbate) anxiety and depression, with mental health more common in the workplace than you realise:

  • Deloitte found that 84 percent of employees experienced mental health issues due to work

  • A PwC report commissioned by the Australian Government found the financial and insurance sector reported the highest instance of mental health conditions, with 33 per cent of people experiencing an issue with mental wellbeing.

So is a job you hate really worth it?

This week’s blog looks at the ‘time to go’ signs to look for, and why you need to take notice.

Eight ways Introverts can thrive in Business

“I worry that there are people put into positions of authority because they are good talkers. It’s so easy to confuse schmoozing ability with talent. Someone seems like a good presenter, easy to get along with, and those traits are rewarded. They’re valuable traits, but we put too much of a premium on presenting and not enough on substance and critical thinking.”

- A highly successful venture capitalist, speaking in Susan Cain’s best seller, “Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Cant Stop Talking”

As a quiet child, I - and probably every other quiet child - would’ve been told that if they want to succeed in work and in life, they be more confident, vocal and assertive.

And while businesses recognise the contribution made by introverts, it’s their gregarious extroverted counterparts that continue to reap the spotlight and recognition.

So do you need to “overcome” your introverted tendencies to succeed in a physical and cultural corporate culture biased to extroverts?

Well, the short answer is no. And it doesn’t mean an introvert can’t successfully hold high profile roles which require a high level of engagement. Some of the true pioneers all show introverted qualities - think Barack Obama, Warren Buffet, Al Gore and Bill Gates.

Susan Cain’s international best seller, “Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking”, opened my eyes when I reflect on my corporate days trying to climb up the greasy pole.

Through her writing that I’ve realised my quiet tendencies are not a flaw. I just needed to find a way to work with my strengths, rather than against them.

So here are a couple of strategies to use to help make your voice heard and your actions seen, all while still embracing who you are.

Co-workers driving you crazy? Five tricks from an introvert to make open plan working easier

We’ve all someone next to us at work, chomping away and rustling their chip packet, oblivious to the steam that’s slowly emanating from your ears.

Wishing that person a slow and painful death while you’re smothering them with that loud as hell chip packet is tempting isn’t going to take away that angst.

As an introvert who is sensitive to noise, I’ve spent over a decade working in open plan working environments, including a treasury trading floor. I’ve had to come up with all sorts of ways to deal with distracting environments. Here are a couple of proven ways that helped me get on with the job without killing anyone.

Five ways of letting go of perfectionism and why its the best thing you can do for your career AND your life

No matter what gets done and how much is left undone, I am enough - Bréné Brown

Perfectionism is often seen as a virtue, but it could be the very thing holding back your career.

While we like think we're just to striving to be our very best, the pursuit of perfection may be our way of hiding our fears.

Because if our work is flawless and our lives perfect, we won’t ever be hurt or punished.

But perfectionism can make us so afraid of failure that pursuing what we really want gets pushed aside.

From an achievement obsessed perfectionist, here are five tips to find the courage to put ourselves out there - flaws and all.

Life Beyond Corporate - The five lessons I learnt changing careers

When I first quit my corporate job, people congratulated me on my bravery. I didn't feel brave. I felt petrified. And I didn't really decide. My body made the decision for me.

To choose change takes enormous courage. To push yourself into discomfort takes bravery. Especially if you’ve spent most of you career on auto-pilot, letting other people deciding your path, your progression, your skills, your shortcomings for you.

But I’ll tell you, that change is oh-so-worth it. Here’s are some of the things that I learnt since I left the corporate world ….